Circle of Poison, Showing in Katonah on August 2, 2017

static1.squarespace.comOn August 2, the Katonah Village Library will host a free screening of Circle of Poison, the second in a series of documentaries demonstrating the connection between our food and the natural world. The goal of the library’s Food on Film series is to explore the importance of biodiverse, sustainable farming and the effects of industrial and ecological agriculture on the health of people and the planet.

The film will be shown at 7 p.m. in the accessible lower-level Garden Room. There will be an introduction, light refreshments and “meet the farmers” session before the screening, and a Q&A session afterward.

Guest speakers will include Doug Decandia of Bionutrient Food and Farming Group, food growing project coordinator at the Food Bank of Westchester; Deb Taft of Mobius Fields; and Jeff Cordulack, director of the Northeast Organic Farming Association. The series coordinator is Michele Durivage.

The third movie in the series, Queen of the Sun: What the Bees Are Telling Us, will be shown September 13.

Katonah Village Library is located at 26 Bedford Rd., Katonah, NY. For more info, call 914.232.3508, email katref@wlsmail.org or visit KatonahLibrary.org.

Get Fresh Yonkers Farmers’ Market Features Expanded Lineup

Yvonne-Hamilton,-a-Groundwork-Citizen-Farmer-and-Irvington-resident

Nicholas Dagher, Farmer’s Market Intern; Kenneth Garris, Green Team Youth Leader; Jordanne Lewis, Farmers Market Volunteer; Nathan Hunter, Director of Healthy
Communities; and Maggie Tebbetts, Manhattan College Rooftop Garden Intern

The season is in full swing at Get Fresh Yonkers Farmers’ Market, which runs Fridays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. until October 27, 2017 at Philips Manor Hall state historic site. This year the market introduced three new vendors to the Yonkers community: Red Hibiscus Bakery, General Cochran Farm and Acevedo Farm.

Red Hibiscus Bakery’s mission is to “bring a little bit of the islands into each customer’s home,” says founder Farrah Fournillier. Originally from Trinidad and Tobago, Fournillier incorporates New York-grown fruits and spices into her Caribbean baked goods. The bakery specializes in vegan, gluten-free and sugar-free desserts.

George Hoffman of General Cochran Farm raises hormone- and antibiotic-free meats, dairy and eggs with his family in Wassaic. “My team and I want to share the experience of drinking fresh sweet milk, enjoying creamy yogurt and having delicious eggs and meats year round,” Hoffman says.

Acevedo Farm grows quality vegetables in nearby Goshen. “While our family farm is not certified organic—we opted not to become certified organic in order to avoid the complex and bureaucratic process—we don’t believe in using pesticides, and we continue to find ways to grow using the best practices for the land,” says owner Ernest Acevedo.

The market also sells locally grown produce and hydroponic vegetables from Groundwork Hudson Valley’s Citizen Farmers and Science Barge, as well as items from other local vendors, such as Sololi’s colorful artisan jewelry, fabric and goods from Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Get Fresh Yonkers Farmers’ Market is a program of Groundwork Hudson Valley, which empowers communities to reclaim and revitalize environmentally and economically distressed neighborhoods. Based in southwest Yonkers, GWHV partners with residents, city officials, schools, businesses and other nonprofits to bolster food access in underserved communities; refurbish parks, rivers, trails and other public spaces; provide summer employment for Yonkers public high school students; and teach about resilience, climate change and sustainable living aboard the Science Barge, its off-the-grid floating farm on the Hudson River.

For more information about the Get Fresh Yonkers Farmers’ Market, including vending opportunities, contact Nathan Hunter at 914.375.2151 or Nathan@GroundworkHV.org.

Tilly’s Table in Putnam County, NY, Opens in June 2017 with Celebration

The weekend of June 3 and 4, 2017,  will be particularly special in Putnam County, which is celebrating the grand opening of the newly renovated Tilly Foster Farm, as well as Tilly’s Table, the county’s first farm-to-table event venue and restaurant. Weekend festivities will include a live broadcast on KICKS 105.5 radio, live country music, children’s activities and a farmers’ market.

The farm will be open to the public Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Tilly’s Table will host public seatings with a prix fixe menu at 5, 7 and 9 p.m. On Sunday, Tilly’s Table will host the first of what will become a weekly event, the Farmers Sunday Brunch, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 845.808.1840 for reservations (required).

The grand opening is the culmination of several years of planning. The revamped Tilly Foster Farm will offer regular family-friendly activities such as hiking, community gardening and cooking classes, as well as special events. Tilly’s Table complements the farm’s culinary arts program and taps into the growing interest in local, organic food and farm-to-table cuisine. The restaurant will be operated by Al and Joe Ciuffetelli of Homestyle Catering, in Mahopac.

For more info, visit PutnamTillyFoster.com.

 

 

Harvest Moon Offers Food with a View in North Salem, NY

Harvest Moon Farm and Orchard, in North Salem, is known for its farm-fresh apples, produce, eggs, grass-fed meat and locally famous cider donuts. This summer (2017), the farm and restaurant is adding brick-oven pizza, made in an outdoor oven, to their menu. Guests can enjoy their pizza in the outdoor cider garden from 6 to 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through September, with live music playing on Saturday nights.

Adjacent to the Hardscrabble Cider tasting room, the patio features views of the pristine, pastoral farmland and is flanked by a hanging basket-dressed pergola, herb gardens and carefully espaliered apple and pear trees. Guests can enjoy flights of hard cider, New York State craft beer and pizza in this casual outdoor space. General Manager Christine Covino says, “We wanted to create a beautiful, accessible space with a laid-back ambience for the community to enjoy both daily and on weekend nights. Guests can bring their whole family for a casual, fun evening on the farm.”

Open seven days a week, Harvest Moon serves a vibrant farm-based lunch menu from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Guests can choose all-time favorites, such as the Farmer’s Breakfast (bacon, egg and cheese on fresh-baked ciabatta) or new items, such as the Veggie Burger, Grass-Fed Beef Burger and assorted paninis. “The ingredients making up our menu are, as much as possible, sourced from the farm,” explains Covino. “All of the beef and turkey are raised here, the eggs are from our chickens and the vegetables are grown in our fields. It’s a terrific opportunity to offer our customers the best of what we do. Since what we offer depends upon what the farm has available, our menu is constantly evolving. Guests should be ready for some surprises along the way.”

Harvest Moon Farm and Orchard offers food to-go, on the patio or inside on the picnic tables in the newly expanded garden center, featuring pottery, garden tools, supplies and garden décor.

Location: 130 Hardscrabble Rd. North Salem, NY. For more information, visit hmOrchard.com

Rochambeau Farm Stand Opens with More Space and Products

Family-owned Rochambeau Farm Stand has been feeding the Westchester community for several years, both with its own organic vegetables and with specialty items from other local businesses and farms. When the store opens for the season on May 4, 2017, it will have a larger physical space and offer more products than ever, says Farm Manager Natalia Cardona.

“The farm stand will still carry the signature products our customers love, but it has also worked with great new vendors to bring nothing but the best to its shelves,” she says. “Because of the farm’s seasonal nature, it is heavily reliant on what Mother Nature is able to provide—with a little help from our head farmer’s green thumb.”

Rochambeau Farm has long staked its reputation on its organic vegetables (although it’s not “certified organic”). It grows a variety of vegetables, including but not limited to lettuce, tomatoes, zucchini, spinach, swiss chard, cucumbers, peppers, eggplant, garlic and onions. It also sells baked goods, marmalades, local honey, grass-fed meats, NY-based cheeses, gluten-free and paleo products, local soups, hummus, oils, marinades, flowers, herbs, nuts and butters. “Among our customers’ favorite products are Marta’s salsa, pesto, guacamole and gazpacho,” Cardona says.

Store hours are Thursday and Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Shoppers are welcome to visit with the farm animals, including a baby goat born in January.

Rochambeau Farm is located at 214 W. Patent Rd., Mt. Kisco, NY.  For more information, call 914.241.8090 or visit RochambeauFarmNY.com.

Mark Bittman to Speak at Bedford 2020 Food Forum

b20-foodforum-emailart-v3On March 4, 2017, Hudson Valley residents are invited to celebrate local food, farming and cooking at the first Bedford 2020 Food Forum, featuring two “food-world rock stars”—New York Times food journalist Mark Bittman and sustainable food pioneer Michel Nischan, a three-time winner of the James Beard Award.

An event for all community members—home gardeners, chefs, cooks, teens, parents, activists, health-conscious individuals, or anyone who wants to learn more about local food—the forum will be held March 4 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fox Lane High School on Route 172 in Bedford. Participants can engage with experts about our food system and the benefits of local farms and food, and explore initiatives to eliminate food waste and increase food distribution to the needy.

The Bedford 2020 Food Forum was born out of an overwhelming desire from community members to come together to learn, meet the stakeholders and share information about the local food scene in Northern Westchester and surrounding areas,” says forum Co-Chair Olivia Farr. “Our goal is for each attendee to leave the event with inspiring information and one or two specific action plans relevant to their own personal food, health and community priorities.”

The event is organized around four central food themes: Eat (celebrating and advocating for local food, and exploring strategies for better local cooking); Buy (exploring ways to evaluate, purchase and afford local foods; Grow (learning how to cultivate a backyard harvest); and Share (learning about local food security and accessibility, eliminating food waste and how to get involved and help throughout the community).

The keynote presenters will set the stage for the event’s themes of local food and taking action. The opening session will feature Bittman, a renowned author and self-proclaimed guru in “making food in all its aspects understandable.” Later, a general session will be led by Nischan, who founded Wholesome Wave, a leading organization aimed at ensuring affordable, healthy, local food for all.

“We are thrilled to provide the opportunity for community members to interact with these eminent thought leaders in the world of food. Both Mark and Michel bring an incredible depth of knowledge, a deep passion for local food and a unique ability to help individuals make beneficial food choices in line with their own personal goals,” says forum Co-Chair Karen Simons.

The Bedford 2020 Food Forum will also offer dynamic interactive workshops and expert panel discussions on the subjects of Buy, Eat, Grow and Share. Among the topics are The Skinny on What’s Really in Our Food; The Inside Scoop on Shopping a Farmers’ Market Like a Chef; Increasing Healthy Food in Our Schools; How to Get Involved With and Drive Food Policy; Local Success Stories in Feeding the Hungry Among Us; Backyard Bees and Chickens; and The History of the Food Movement in Our Area.

“With nearly twenty workshops, there will be something for everyone,” Simons notes. “A special set of workshops will be tailored to high school students who want to learn about topics from being a food justice leader to careers in food and agriculture.”

The Bedford 2020 Food Forum Expo, a hands-on display and learning venue, will feature an indoor famers’ market, live cooking demonstrations, a book corner, gardening and composting demonstrations, and lively discussion around food health, sustainable food systems, food justice advocacy, food waste and more.

“We anticipate over 50 expo booths at the food forum,” says Bedford 2020 Program Manager Ellen Calves. “The selection criteria for expo participants requires they provide a highly experiential, hands-on opportunity for people to dig in to local food.”

The $25 admission price includes keynote sessions, three self-selected workshops, the expo and a lunch made from seasonal local food. Students are admitted free, and scholarship tickets are available.

This event is anticipated to sell out. Purchase tickets at Bedford2020.org/foodforum. For more information, email Info@Bedford2020.org or call 914.620.2411.

 

Whole Foods Donates $14K to Westchester Land Trust

wlt_whole-foods-nbWhole Foods Market: Westchester County has donated more than $14,000 to the Westchester Land Trust (WLT), the result of a community giving day held at each of the store’s three Westchester locations: Port Chester, White Plains and Yonkers.

“We are deeply grateful to all in the Westchester community who made a special effort to shop at Whole Foods Market on their 5 percent community giving day in December, and for Whole Foods for selecting Westchester Land Trust as their beneficiary,” says WLT President Lori Ensinger. “Whole Foods Market Westchester has long supported WLT’s sustainable agriculture programs and our efforts to preserve our region’s remaining farmland. This recent donation will help us support local farmers and ensure that community members have access to locally grown and nutrient-dense food.”

On WLT’s farm plots at its Sugar Hill Farm headquarters, the organization teaches hundreds of volunteers of all ages to grow organic vegetables and “green” their communities. The produce raised at the farm is donated to WLT’s partner, the Food Bank for Westchester, for distribution to families in need throughout the county. During the 2016 growing season, WLT volunteers harvested a record-breaking 2,670 pounds of produce, providing more than 12,900 individual servings of nutrient-rich food.

“We were thrilled to support the Westchester Land Trust and their Sugar Hill Farm project,” says Karen Greene, Whole Foods Market’s metro marketer for Westchester County. “We couldn’t be happier to provide financial support for their ongoing work and dedication to preserving and protecting the environment through various programs, in addition to providing fresh food for the underserved in our communities.”

Whole Foods created this fundraiser to give back to local communities through support of nonprofit organizations whose programs directly benefit the communities surrounding their stores. Four days a year, each store selects a local organization to receive 5 percent of its net sales on that day.

Based in Bedford Hills, WLT works with public and private partners to preserve land in perpetuity and enhance the natural resources in Westchester and eastern Putnam Counties, a densely populated region under persistent threat from the pressures of development. Through the use of conservation easements and outright acquisition, WLT seeks to benefit the long-term health of these communities by safeguarding air quality, food supply and community character, as well as critical watershed areas. Since its founding in 1988, WLT has preserved almost 8,000 acres of open space, including more than 700 acres of preserves owned by the organization which are free and open to the public.

For more info about WLT, visit WestchesterLandTrust.org, follow them on Facebook and Instagram (@WestchesterLandTrust) and on Twitter (@WLT_NY).