Fresh Starts: Seeking special plants to get your garden going? Mark your calendar for these plant sales.

 

fresh starts

Stony Kill Farm Plant Sale and Spring Celebration

Our region is blessed with an abundance of small farms, so in the spring, plant sales pop up as reliably as daffodils. There are many reasons to buy spring plants from a farm rather than a retailer, not the least of which is the fact that you’re supporting a local (and often family-owned) business.

Unlike large nurseries or big box stores, local farms specialize in organically grown veggies, herbs and flowers that flourish in our climate—typically offering a wider variety of plants, including many that can’t be found in retail stores. Because these farms don’t use persistent pesticides, their plants won’t kill bees (harming our food supply) or produce food that’s hazardous to ingest.

And because local farms are part of the fabric of our community, their plant sales are true community events—springtime celebrations where families are welcome. Kids love visiting farms, and they learn a lot in the process. So save the date for one or more of the local plant sales coming up in May.

Hilltop Hanover Farm’s Spring Plant Sale
April 26-May 31
Fridays 1p.m.-6 p.m.
Saturdays 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Plants for sale: Cool-season annual flowers, herbs and vegetable transplants, including early-blooming columbine, snapdragons and diasca; organic lavender, chives, chamomile, dill, lemon balm, mint mojito and sage; and naturally grown lettuce, spinach, kale, peas and chard. Come any weekend for veggie, herb and flower transplants, all grown at Hilltop, plus finished annuals and organic herbs.

Family fun: The farm stand will be stocked with local farm products such as seeds, honey, maple syrup, breads and baked goods.

Something special: Look for cottage garden annuals, specialty cut flowers and pollinator plants. Strawberries, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, cucumbers and squash plants, plus lots of summer flowers, will be ready in early May. All transplants produced at Hilltop Hanover are grown using organic practices.

Hilltop Hanover Farm, 1271 Hanover St., Yorktown Heights, NY HilltopHanoverFarm.org

 

Stony Kill Farm Plant Sale and Spring Celebration
May 4, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. (Rain date May 5)

Plants for sale: Plants for vegetable and herb gardens.

Family fun: Baby animals, sheep shearing demo, wool spinner, live music, open barn, open greenhouse, crafts, face painter, concession stand and more.

Something extra: Stony Kill Beekeepers will have an informational booth, and the Stony Kill gardeners will have an informational table on pollinator gardening.

Stony Kill Farm, 79 Farmstead Lane , Wappingers Falls, NY , 845.831.3800; StonyKill.org, Stony Kill Foundation, Inc.@Facebook.com

 

Poughkeepsie Farm Project Farm Fest and Plant Sale
May 4 & 11, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Plants for sale: Nearly 100 varieties of vegetables, flowers and herbs.

Family fun: Food truck, live music, smoothie and interactive popcorn stations, craft and farmer’s market offering Hudson Valley-made products, Poughkeepsie Farm Project merchandise including herbal body products, gardening book fair, children’s book readings, kid-friendly activities.

Something extra: This is Poughkeepsie Farm Project’s 20th year of connecting food, farm and community in the Hudson Valley. Visitors are invited to tour the farm fields, meet the team, learn about the farm’s programs and activities and explore its meditation and discovery gardens.

Poughkeepsie Farm Project, 51 Vassar Farm Ln., Poughkeepsie, NY, FarmProject.org/farm-fest 


 

ryder farmSPACE on Ryder Farm Mother’s Day Weekend Plant Sale
May 11, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
May 12, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Plants for sale: Hanging baskets and a wide selection of flowers, herbs and vegetable starts, including 11 varieties of heirloom tomatoes, summer and winter squash, salad greens, sweet and spicy pepper varieties and more, all certified organic and grown on Ryder Farm.

Family fun: Guided tours of Ryder Farm, a food truck for picnicking on the lawn, children’s activities.

Something extra: The plant sale will be the official start of SPACE on Ryder Farm’s first growing season. Plants and produce will be available for purchase at the roadside farmstand on Starr Ridge Road through November.

Ryder Farm, 406 Starr Ridge Rd., Brewster, NY, SpaceOnRyderFarm.org

 

common groundCommon Ground Farm Plant Sale
May 11, 2 p.m.-5 p.m.

Plants for sale: Vegetables, flowers and herbs, including classic favorites like basil, cherry tomatoes, lettuce and kale, as well as more unusual and unique heirloom varieties such as husk cherries, fairytale eggplant and purple basil, all organically grown at Common Ground Farm. Come early for best selection.

Family fun: Children’s arts and crafts, and the opportunity to meet the farmers and ask them about growing techniques and varieties.

Something extra: All proceeds go to support Common Ground Farm’s mission of food access and education.

Common Ground Farm Plant Sale, Corner of Cross and Main Streets, Beacon, NY; Rain location: Beacon Yoga Center, 464 Main St., Beacon, NY, Common Ground Farm Spring Plant Sale @Facebook.com

 

vendorsAnnual Lasdon Park Plant Sale
May 18, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. May 19,
10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Special preview for Friends of Lasdon Park and Arboretum: May 17, 6-8 p.m.

Plants for sale: A broad selection of colorful annuals, including many hard-to-find and popular favorites that are easy to plant and care for.

Family fun: Vendors selling crafts, food, gifts and other items.

Something extra: A special conservatory exhibit will feature blooming orchids and more. Admission is $7 for adults and $3 for children 12 and under. Tickets available at the Shop at Lasdon.

Lasdon Park, Arboretum and Veterans Memorial, 2610 Amawalk Rd. (Rte. 35), Somers, NY LasdonPark.org

 

 

 

Farm-Fresh Local Food: CSAs get flexible with new features like choose-your-own produce, special add-ons and sliding-scale prices.

 

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Education Manager Ellie Limpert in one of three high tunnels at Poughkeepsie Farm Project

When people join a CSA (community supported agriculture) program—paying a local farm up-front for a season-long supply of produce—everybody wins. The farm benefits from the early investment. Members benefit from the nutritious produce (typically fresh picked and chemical free). The local economy benefits, and so does the environment (no toxic pesticides or long-haul trucks).

Buying produce through a CSA can also be cost-effective, especially now that many farms offer flexible plans that allow customers to buy just what they need. Best of all, CSAs build relationships between farmers and the neighbors they feed. CSAs are about community above all else.

Planting season is here, which means CSA signups have begun. Here are a few local farms that offer CSA programs.

 

Fable: From Farm to Table
fableLocated in historic Ossining, Fable is a farm and food hub dedicated to sustainable agriculture. The farm grows produce using organic practices and has pasture-raised chickens its CSA members can meet and feed.

“We believe that through dedication, hard work and modern technological advancements in agriculture, we can provide the freshest produce all year round without the use of harmful pesticides,” says owner Tom Deacon.

Last year Fable introduced its new CSA Farm Card, “with great reviews,” Deacon says. CSA members purchase a Farm Card that they can spend like cash throughout the year in the farm’s market, choosing their own produce—as much or as little as they’d like—over the course of the growing season. Weekly selections are simply subtracted from their credit balance.

A CSA membership helps support the farm during the colder months, and allows us to prepare for an abundant spring and summer harvest,” Deacon says.

Cost: $250-$1,000 for a CSA Farm Card.

What’s included? With the Farm Card, CSA members can purchase any item in Fable’s Market, including produce, eggs, honey and milk. The market is open on weekends year-round, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Fable: From Farm to Table, 1311 Kitchawan Rd., Ossining, NY. Info: FableFoods.com.

 

Harvest Moon Farm and Orchard
harvest20moonHarvest Moon Farm and Orchard, a family-owned and -operated apple orchard in North Salem, grows a variety of stone fruits and vegetables that it sells in its Farm Store and through its CSA. The owners, first-generation farmers, have expanded their harvest every year since opening for business in 2011.

“We are passionate about what we do,” says CSA Manager Todd Stevens. “Simply put, our goal is to supply our community with the freshest produce possible, directly from the farmer.” Harvest Moon grows its food using an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) system, which means that organic fertilizers and pest controls are used whenever possible. All of Harvest Moon’s produce is planted and harvested by hand.

Cost: $325-$810. Customers can choose between 13-week and 18-week seasons, and half- or full-bushel shares.

What’s included? Produce typically available includes lettuce, chard, spinach, kale, peaches, nectarines, tomatoes, cucumbers, carrots, zucchini, melons, peppers, beets, corn, onions, squashes, apples, eggplant and potatoes. Each box includes a dozen farm-fresh eggs, and fresh-pressed sweet cider as available. CSA add-ons include milk, cheese and/or beef shares. A flower add-on includes a fresh, farm-grown bouquet every week for 12 weeks.

Harvest Moon Farm and Orchard, 130 Hardscrabble Rd., North Salem, NY. Info: 914.485.1210, HarvestMoonFarmAndOrchard.com.

 

Poughkeepsie Farm Project
projectPoughkeepsie Farm Project—a 12-acre organic farm whose produce is Certified Naturally Grown—has been connecting food, farm and community for 20 years.

“Not only are we a CSA operating on an urban farm, but we also annually donate 20 percent of our harvest to emergency food providers in the Hudson Valley,” says Ray Armater, executive director. “So in addition to supporting local, small-scale farming, our CSA members are also supporting the organization’s greater mission in the region.”

The farm’s flexible CSA model allows members to select their share size and the items in their share. They can also work with the farm crew for a discounted share, and go out into the fields to pick their own flowers, berries, cherry tomatoes, herbs, hot peppers and other produce. “Pick-your-own allows members and their families to engage with the farm, and it’s a great way for kids to get hands-on with helping to harvest and taste,” Armater says.

The CSA is unique in the amount of flexibility and choice it offers while still staying true to a traditional CSA model, he adds. Members can select 5 or 10 items from a choice of 14 to 20 different items each week. Produce is arranged farmers market-style, and is always harvested fresh and at peak ripeness for maximum nutrition and flavor.

Cost: $445-$885 for a weekly whole or half share (generally 12 to 18 pounds) for a 23-week season. Discounts for work share option.

What’s included? Produce throughout the season, with fruit shares available July through November and the option to purchase locally raised, grass-fed beef from Back Paddock Farm.

Poughkeepsie Farm Project, 51 Vassar Farm Ln., Poughkeepsie, NY. Info: 845.516.1100, FarmProject.org.

 

Ryder Farm
ryderCSA members at Ryder Farm, in Brewster, are helping support one of the oldest organic farms on the East Coast, as well as the larger mission of SPACE on Ryder Farm, a residency program for artists and activists. SPACE, which now oversees farm operations, will host a special “happy hour” pickup party for the first pickup of each month at the farm, where CSA members can mingle with each other and SPACE’s resident artists. A new, sliding-scale CSA has been introduced to ensure memberships are accessible to everyone in the community.

“We recognize that not everyone has access to the monetary resources to receive good, fresh food, but together with our CSA members, we have the capacity to make this possible,” says Farm Manager Doug DeCandia. “So starting this year, with our sliding scale membership, folks who can pay more do, while folks who cannot, pay what they can.”

Cost: $320-$1,150 for weekly or every other week shares, which can be picked up at Ryder Farm or in New York City. Sliding-scale price options available.

What’s included? Organic herbs and vegetables “from A to Z,” plus art created by friends and alumni of SPACE’s artist residency programs.

Ryder Farm, 406 Starr Ridge Rd., Brewster, NY. Info: 646.833.8159, SpaceOnRyderFarm.org/farm.

 

 

 

Ryder Farm Changes Management: SPACE assumes operations as Betsey Ryder retires

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SPACE on Ryder Farm interns with organic produce and plants to be sold starting in May

SPACE on Ryder Farm, the residency program for artists and activists, has assumed management of the organic farming operations at Ryder Farm, succeeding Betsey Ryder of Ryder Farm Cottage Industries, who retired at the end of the 2018 growing season after 40 years of farming. As part of the management shift, SPACE has launched a sliding-scale CSA (community supported agriculture) program.

Located on Starr Ridge Road in Brewster, Ryder Farm is one of the oldest family farms in the Northeast, first established by Eleazer Ryder in 1795. It was an early adopter in the organic movement. Betsey Ryder has been growing organic vegetables, herbs and flowers on the farm since 1978, following in the footsteps of her cousin Hall Gibson and five generations of Ryders before her. Betsey maintained the farm’s presence at the local Brewster market, as well as a robust CSA program, and worked to keep the farm’s 127 acres from being sold for development.

Keeping a Legacy Alive
Emily Simoness, a seventh-generation Ryder, co-founded SPACE in 2011 along with Susan Goodwillie. They created the nonprofit with the two-fold mission of providing time and space for artists and innovators to develop new work, while contributing to the sustainability and resourceful preservation of Ryder Farm.

Located on the grounds of the 224-year-old family homestead, SPACE creates an environment singular in its ability to invigorate artists and innovators and their work, says Simoness, its executive director. Each year, SPACE welcomes nearly 150 artists and activists to the farm for fully subsidized residencies of one to five weeks.

“Since SPACE’s founding, art and agriculture have been in concert on Ryder Farm,” she says. “At a time when family farms are being lost across the country due to economic pressures and the lack of succession plans, SPACE is deeply committed to ensuring Ryder Farm is still farming in another 224 years.”

“Emily arrived to the farm and saw the inspiration inherent in this land and created a vehicle for others to engage in the nurturing and cultivation of their craft,” says Betsey Ryder. “I am lifted by the enthusiasm of SPACE for taking on our agricultural legacy. I am confident that SPACE will grow upon the agricultural base and carry Ryder Farm to new heights.”

What’s New on the Farm
Farmers Jason McCartney and Doug DeCandia will lead farm operations at SPACE. As director of farming, McCartney brings nearly a decade of experience from across the East Coast, including Brookwood Community Farm in Massachusetts and Matunuck Farm in Rhode Island. Farm Manager DeCandia has worked extensively with the Food Bank for Westchester (now known as Feeding Westchester) as both a farmer and a food justice activist. He also previously worked at Ryder Farm in 2010, and says he’s happy to be returning now to work with SPACE.

In addition to stocking SPACE’s residency kitchen, produce from Ryder Farm will be available via sliding-scale CSA memberships. Weekly shares of vegetables and herbs will be available for pickup at the farm and in New York City from June to October. SPACE also will sell produce weekly at Ryder Farm’s roadside stand on Starr Ridge Road in Brewster.

To sign up for a 2019 CSA membership, visit SpaceOnRyderFarm.org/farm or, en Español, SpaceOnRyderFarm.org/granja. For more info, visit SpaceOnRyderFarm.org.

 

 

Women’s Work: The New Face of the Small Farm Is Female

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Diane Zlotnikov, Z Farms Organic Food

The face of the American farmer has changed over the decades, from a man on his horse-drawn plow, to a man on his tractor, to a man overseeing other men on a factory farm. Now America is returning to its agricultural roots, embracing small farms run with natural practices. And often as not, the face of that small farm is female.

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Sarah Simon
Farm Director, Common Ground Farm

Located on nine acres leased from Stony Kill Environmental Center, in Wappingers Falls, Common Ground Farm has a small footprint but a big mission. Part of a larger nonprofit that focuses on food access and education, it donates half the organic produce it grows, operates farmers’ markets that accept food benefits, and is working with schools to get more locally grown food on kids’ lunch trays.

Farm Director Sarah Simon says Common Ground relies on volunteers and supporters, as well as partnerships with local businesses, to keep the mission going. Sallyeander Soaps, in Beacon, uses the farm’s organic flowers in his calendula dandelion soap, and gives part of the revenue back to Common Ground. The farm has a similar arrangement with another Beacon business, Drink More Good, which uses the farm’s cucumbers, mint and jalapenos in its seasonal soda syrups. Hudson Valley Brewery is also working on a beer made from the farm’s fresh herbs.

“These value-added producers turn our perishable produce into a more shelf-stable and diverse array of products,” she says.

Simon would like Common Ground to be a connection between the local farm movement and food access in our communities, so that small farmers can help prevent hunger while running viable, resilient businesses.

“Every community needs strong local businesses to provide meaningful employment and quality products,” she says. “Farms are an especially important part of this picture because they preserve open spaces, provide food security in an otherwise fluctuating global marketplace, and offer a way for people to remain connected to their food and the means of agricultural production, which otherwise frequently results in worker exploitation.”

She says it’s important for farmers to focus on the well-being of their workers, and for the general community to be aware of the financial challenges many farmers face.

“The minimum wage in New York State is going up, which is a very good thing but a challenge for many small farms,” she says. “When you look at the price of local produce, it’s important to understand that you are helping support local jobs.”

Common Ground Farm
Stony Kill Environmental Center
Wappingers Falls, NY
845.231.4424
sarah@commongroundfarm.org
CommonGroundFarm.org

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Elizabeth Ryder
Owner, Ryder Farm

Family farms were once the mainstay of American agriculture, but the industrialization of farming pushed most families off their land and out of the business. Not so with Ryder Farm, which is proof positive that with tenacity, good management and fair government, the family farm can survive and thrive.

“Our family farm goes back to 1795,” says Elizabeth Ryder. “In 1975, the pressure of rising taxes was weighing heavily upon our fallow farm, and we acted upon a new initiative put forth by New York State in an effort to save small family farms such as ours.” As the Ag District Law provided some tax relief to operations meeting certain requirements in agricultural production, the Ryders decided to go organic.

Now Ryder Farm produces organic vegetables, herbs and flowers, and it recently acquired Red Angus beef cattle. It also won a Natural Resources Conservation Service grant to enhance its pastures for grazing. One younger family member founded an artist retreat center, Space on Ryder Farm, to engage local residents and give them access to the farm. “Space has proclaimed their dedication to keeping agriculture here on the farm in the foreseeable future,” Ryder says. The farm also welcomes farm visits and offers programing that’s open to the public.

By keeping the farm viable, Ryder says, the family hopes to retain the rural character of the Westchester-Putnam area. “That’s a challenge,” she admits. “Our proximity to New York and local transit encourages population growth and the associated loss of open space. I’ve always felt that farms provide the working landscape of open space. A farm such as ours gives people an opportunity to buy local farm products from a known and trusted source, while helping preserve the area’s historic character.”

It makes sense that Ryder is very supportive of other local farmers, whom she sees as collaborators in a greater mission. “We understand that feeding the soil is what feeds the plant that feeds us,” she says.

Ryder Farm
400 Starr Ridge Rd.
Brewster, NY
845-279-4161
ryderfarmorganic@aol.com
RyderFarmOrganic.com

marykate

MaryKate Chillemi
Partner/Farmer, Meadowland Farm

Meadowland Farm is a small small farm, a market garden operated by just two people, MaryKate Chillemi and her partner, Chris Hausman. It is located in Clinton Corners in Dutchess County, on an original homestead that dates back to 1790. Over the years, the farm has been home to dairy and livestock animals. Now Chillemi and Hausman use biodynamic growing methods to produce heirloom vegetables, fruit, mushrooms, flowers, herbs and honey.

“We’re students of biodynamics and continue to educate ourselves on such practices,” Chillemi says. “We use the biodynamic planting calendar and make our own compost, herbal teas and preparations. We are also transitioning this property to no-till, and by next year all of our beds will be permanent. It’s overall better for our soil not to be compacted by tractors, and for our rocky soil, it is the most manageable for our scale.”

She and Hausman lease their pasture to Dirty Dog Farm, whose grass-fed cows provide the manure necessary to build Meadowland’s compost, which Chillemi calls “the heart of the farm.” They are also building a greenhouse on site, which will eliminate the long drive to rented greenhouse space at a neighboring farm 30 minutes away. Future plans include introducing some high tunnels to the operation and improving the farm’s overall infrastructure.

Farming is hard work, physically and logistically, Chillemi says, but it’s worth the good results: closing the carbon footprint, giving more people access to organic, local food, and empowering small communities to resist the encroachment of national corporations.

“It’s not easy or lucrative, but you don’t farm if you’re trying to make money,” she says. “For us, it’s a spiritual journey, one we see as playing an important role in the world. And for that I feel very proud and honored.”

Meadowland Farm
689 Schultzville Rd.
Clinton Corners, NY
914.400.3298
MeadowlandFarmNY.com

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Diane Smolyar-Zlotnikov,
Manager, Z Farms Organic Food

Diane Smolyar-Zlotnikov, M.D., is an internal medicine doctor and endocrinologist who works in general practice and urgent care online, through telemedicine. Oh, and she runs Z Farms Organic Food in Dover Plains, handling day-to-day operations, management, organic certification and even beekeeping.

“It’s my hobby-turned-small-business that I do part time,” she explains. “I turned to farming to connect to the land and show appreciation for its beauty and bounty. Transforming an abandoned parcel that was last farmed in 1940—overgrown fields, falling-apart fences, a totally wrecked 18th-century farmhouse—into a fully functional certified organic farming operation gives us pride and sense of accomplishment.”

The Z Farms farm stand is open 365 days a year, from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., selling certified grass-fed beef, lamb and goat; pasture-raised poultry; eggs and berries. It also delivers to customers in local zip codes within 22 miles from the farm (with a one-time $70 minimum order).

Zlotnikov says she was surprised at first by the high cost of running a certified organic local farm—a cost that must be factored into the price of organic produce, making it unaffordable to some people. “We participate in the Farmers Market Nutrition program, both at the Pawling farmers market and at the farm stand, to somewhat help the situation, and we are trying to restructure certain aspects of operations to make prices more affordable. It is a work in progress for us,” she says.

She’s hoping the farm can establish a local volunteering program, which would ease their labor shortage and enable them to charge less for their products. The farm also might launch a “pick-your-own” program for berries and apples, once those crops are in full production.

As a physician, Zlotnikov sees the farm’s mission as educational as well as agricultural. “Ideally, the farm is not only a source of high-quality food but also an educational center, promoting healthy lifestyle and safe environment. We will gradually develop programs and classes for the community.”

Ultimately, she says, organic farming doesn’t just promote human health; it also promotes the health of the land.

Z Farms Organic Food
355 Poplar Hill Rd.
Dover Plains, NY
917.319.6414
zfarmsorganic@gmail.com
ZFarmsOrganic.com

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Bethann Bruno
Farm Manager, Fable: From Farm to Table

Bethann Bruno has been farming for 20 years. When not working as the farm manager for Fable: From Farm to Table, she creates small vegetable gardens and edible landscapes for local homeowners. She also teaches gardeners how to use their land more efficiently.

“I began farming at a very young age,” she says. “I have always had a love of the field and placing my hands in the soil. I love watching everything grow. Seeing a seed turn into a seedling, and then produce a crop, really lights me up.”

Fable, a farm in Ossining, is operated by a strong, close-knit team of farmers who work year-round producing organic, nutrient-rich herbs, fruits and vegetables, including leafy greens, herbs, tomatoes and garlic. They use modern technological advancements such as greenhouses, hydroponics and vertical farming to grow their produce as sustainably possible. They also keep pasture-raised chickens for eggs.

Local residents benefit from Fable in many ways, Bruno says. “We supply them with fresh, organically grown produce that we sowed and planted by hand. They can also come volunteer and learn from us. We can show them how to work the fields, and they can apply that knowledge to their own garden. We can also show them how hydroponic growing works in our 200-tower greenhouse. Locals are always stopping by to volunteer and visit and are full of questions. We appreciate their help on the farm, and we hope they leave happy, with the answers they needed.”

Of course there are challenges to farming, she says. “When I wake up in the morning, my list of daily tasks depends on the weather. And I spend a lot of time tilling the fields and laying the plastic and irrigation by hand. A plastic mulch layer and tractor is on my wish list.”

Fable: From Farm to Table
1311 Kitchawan Rd.
Ossining, NY
914.862.0205
FableFoods.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Awakenings’ Chef, Restaurant and Farm Profiles for 2013

Hilltop-stone-wallWant to support your local farmers? Trying to go vegan, organic or gluten-free? Looking for a cooking class, a caterer or a personal chef? Lucky for you, something’s always cooking in Westchester and Putnam, where fresh, sustainable and delicious are just around the corner.

Bates Northern Farm

Jacqueline Steigleman, Owner

1 Bloomer Rd., North Salem, NY 10560

914.669.8275 • Jackie@batesnorthernfarm.com •  BatesNorthernFarm.com

Tell us about your business: We are a garden center and farmers’ market

What services or products do you offer? Our full-service garden center focuses on hanging baskets, a wide selection of annuals and perennials, soils, mulch, and garden design and installation. Inside the store we have homemade baked goods and soups; gluten-free/vegan baked goods and snacks; seasonal local organic produce; and local honey, jams, maple syrup and gift items. We offer handmade wreaths throughout the year; we change with the seasons, all the way through Christmas.

Any classes, events, specials or limited-time offers? This summer we are operating a farmers’ market two days a week with local farms.

What is your goal or professional passion? Our passion is flowers, farms and gardens. We keep it simple, delicious, beautiful and real!

The Blue Pig

Lisa Moir, Chef/Owner

121 Maple St.,Croton-on-Hudson, NY 10520

914.271.3850

lisa@thebluepigicecream.com • TheBluePigIceCream.com

Tell us about your business: The Blue Pig makes homemade, locally sourced ice cream from scratch. We use milk from Hudson Valley Fresh dairy co-op and local maple syrup, honey and eggs, and we grow our own herbs and strawberries on our rooftop garden. We’ve added several new light lunch/dinner items to our menu—two or three vegetarian offerings made daily with seasonal ingredients.

What services or products do you offer? We offer 16 homemade ice cream flavors that change daily and with the seasons; coconut milk “ice cream;” ice cream cakes and pies; baked goods; and new vegetarian sides like Thai noodles, curried vegetables, couscous salad and fresh, local mixed greens. We have beautiful outdoor patio seating.

What is your goal or professional passion? We are passionate about healthy food and a healthy environment—in fact, we just won two county awards for our outstanding sustainable business practices. We strive to show by example how growing your own food and eating local is a step we can all take to help the earth.

Boni-Bel Farm & Country Store

301 Doansburg Rd., Brewster, NY 10509

845.278.2060 • swozniak@greenchimneys.org • GreenChimneys.org

Tell us about your business: Green Chimneys Boni-Bel Farm & Country Store offers handcrafted gifts, produce from our organic garden, specialty foods from local vendors, and items made by Green Chimneys students. As a working farm, Boni-Bel produces vegetables, flowers, and maple syrup, all of which are sold at the Country Store. Students from our school participate in each step of production and sale of our products. Green Chimneys is a multifaceted nonprofit organization serving children with special needs.

What services or products do you offer? We offer Boni-Bel’s own organic fruits and vegetables, seasonal produce from local farms, local and student-made maple syrup, local and raw honey, farm-fresh eggs, artisanal cheeses, wool from Green Chimneys sheep, and more.

What is your goal or professional passion? Boni-Bel Farm provides Green Chimneys School students with a rich environment in which to interact with nature as they learn about and become responsible for our many plants and discover new skills. The garden program is connected to the Green Chimneys School Life Skills class, in which students learn to cook the food they grow. The Country Store serves primarily as a vocational training site and introduces Green Chimneys students to the operations and service functions of a retail store.

Clock Tower Grill Kitchen & Bar

Rich Parente, Executive Chef/Owner

512 Clock Tower Dr., Brewster, NY 10509

845.582.0574 • info@clocktowergrill.com • ClockTowerGrill.com

Tell us about your business: We celebrate America’s best ingredients in a sophisticated yet casual barn-chic setting.

What services or products do you offer? During the summer we have live music on Friday nights, as well as movie night Wednesdays at sundown. We also cater both on- and off-premises; our second dining room seats 75 people.

What is your goal or professional passion? We are here to do what we love: put out awesome food at a fair price, using as much local, sustainable and organic as possible when available. The kitchen is my playground, so come in and have some fun with us, just like our motto says: EAT – LAUGH – LIVE.

Clean Plate Culinary Inc.

Natasha S. Bernardez, President/Executive Chef

347.644.8306 • info@cpculinary.com • CleanPlateCulinary.com

Tell us about your business: Clean Plate Culinary’s mission is to encourage personal and collective culinary creativity while providing a top-class farm-to-table dining experience with flawless execution. With Clean Plate Culinary running your event, the food will be fresh and delicious, the service will be excellent and your guests will be wowed.

What services or products do you offer? We offer farm-to-table catering services, cooking classes and parties, corporate wellness services, and personal chef-food delivery services.

Any classes, events, specials or limited-time offers? In August we are launching a new series of cooking classes for chefs at heart, amateurs and everyone in between. We’re kicking it off with a themed cocktail event.

What is your goal or professional passion? Our goal is to provide a culinary adventure for everyone we come in contact with. Healthy food should be delectable and satisfying. At Clean Plate Culinary, our motto is that every meal should be “Clean, Simple & Delicious.”

The Freight House Café

Donna Massaro, Owner/Chef

609 Route 6, Mahopac, NY 10541

845.628.1872

TheFreightHouseCafe@yahoo.com • TheFreightHouseCafe.com

Tell us about your business: Local. Natural. Good. We serve salads, wraps, sandwiches, breakfast and lunch all day, and we have takeout baskets for cyclists on the bike trail and we offer free delivery to local businesses. We are open seven days a week: Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

What services or products do you offer? We serve flatbreads, gluten-free breads and are allergy-conscious. Our café features free Wi-Fi, an outside deck, a historical interior, live music, art shows, poetry readings, fundraisers, and local, handmade crafts and art for sale. Our menu includes protein shakes, fresh juices, iced coffee and chai teas.

Any classes, events, specials or limited-time offers? We offer live music, comedy shows, and poetry readings at the cafe after dark. Call for details.

What is your goal or professional passion? My passion is to create a community of people who enjoy and respect good, clean food. I believe in the greater good and want my customers and employees to know that their food has been treated with respect and love.

The Frosty Noggin: All Natural Smoothies & Frozen Yogurt

Robert Lieb and Nona Backer, Owners

20 Charles Colman Blvd., Pawling, NY 12564

thefrostynoggin@yahoo.com

Tell us about your business: The Frosty Noggin is a new way to enjoy delicious yet healthy foods that emanate the sweetness only real fruits and vegetables can, with all the rich vitamins and minerals included. Kids love it and don’t even notice that our products contain no added sugar or flavorings. A healthy, comfortable atmosphere is what The Frosty Noggin represents.

What services or products do you offer? We offer a full menu of mouth-watering fresh fruit and vegetable smoothies with optional organic protein boosters, along with healthy frozen yogurt and gelato as a refreshing beverage, a dessert or even a meal.  Our self-serve frozen yogurt includes gluten-free and dairy-free options, and it is all made with active probiotic cultures for improved vitamin and mineral absorption, immunity and digestive health. All our smoothies are made from farm-to-blender juiced or pureed fruits and vegetables, with no preservatives, added sweeteners or flavorings. We use all-natural ingredients—nothing more!

What is your goal or professional passion? Robert Lieb: Years ago I got the idea for providing great-tasting, healthy food that has all the vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients that fresh fruit and vegetables have to offer. My passion for children’s health (stemming from my work as a special education teacher), combined with my chiropractic and nutrition background, and Nona’s experience as a weight loss coach with her company, Nutritional Adjustment, motivated us to indulge the community’s palate with food that is both healthy and delicious—hence, The Frosty Noggin.

Healthy Culinary Creations LLC

Laurie Gershgorn, Gourmet Chef/Owner

914.930.1591 • laurie@healthyculinarycreations.com • HealthyCulinaryCreations.com

Tell us about your business: Healthy Culinary Creations LLC has been providing food and nourishment that helps and empowers people to eat truly healthy, and live a healthier lifestyle since its inception in 2007.  My cooking style is inspired by the seasons; covers a wide range of ethnic tastes, traditional cultures, and holistic philosophies; and caters to the needs of the customers.

What services or products do you offer? I provide freshly prepared delicious, economical meals and juices, as well as catering, meal-planning assistance, holistic guidance, cooking classes and workshops. The emphasis is on using local, bio-farmed, organic, fair trade ingredients to create plant-based menus; I specialize in serving those with specific food requirements and restrictions and health challenges.

Any classes, events, specials or limited-time offers? For July and August only, I will deduct 10 percent off one introductory cooking service for new clients who mention Natural Awakenings. Check my website for the events calendar.

What is your goal or professional passion? I am committed to offering services that are good for the customer, community and planet by providing the highest-quality, healthiest food and juices and educating and teaching people how to use food to support a strong body, mind and spirit, while continually honing my craft and advocating for sustainable farming.

Hilltop Hanover Farm & Environmental Center

1271 Hanover St., Yorktown Heights, NY 10598

914.962.2368 • info@hilltophanoverfarm.org • HilltopHanoverFarm.org

Tell us about your business: Hilltop Hanover Farm & Environmental Center is a working crop farm and environmental education facility located in Yorktown Heights, NY. Formerly a dairy farm, and with roots dating back to the 1600s, today Hilltop Hanover acts as a regional education hub, offering programs on healthy and sustainable food production, skills for small-scale suburban and urban farmers, and sustainable living practices for local communities.

What services or products do you offer? The farm features demonstration models for backyard farming, animal management, rainwater harvesting, organic composting and green-roof technology. Visitors are encouraged to come and hike the farm’s 3.5 miles of woodland trails, enjoy a picnic overlooking the property and visit our chickens and goats. Hilltop Hanover holds numerous classes and lectures, offers seasonal CSA shares and maintains a farm stand and U-Pick program during the growing season. Hilltop Hanover Farm also offers guided tours, classes and field trips for school groups, garden clubs and scout troops.

Any classes, events, specials or limited-time offers? Farmstand is open every Friday (1-6 p.m.) and Saturday (10 a.m. – 4 p.m.). U-Pick Vegetables will open in July. July workshop schedule: 7/6 Fermented Foods; 7/20 Garden Checkup and Private Farm Tour; 7/27 Behind the Scenes Tour; and 7/27 Pickling 101.

What is your goal or professional passion? Hilltop Hanover Farm and Environmental Center is dedicated to the development and advancement of sustainable agriculture, environmental stewardship, community education, and accessible food systems for all.

Jnana Organics Nourishment for Body, Mind & Spirit

Patricia Trongone, Owner/Founder

255 N. Bedford Rd., Mt. Kisco, NY 10549

(behind Atlantic Appliance & Wipe Your Paws)

914.864.2727 (shop) • 917.592.8360 (cell)

jnanaorganics@gmail.com • JnanaOrganics.tumblr.comPatricia.YourBodyIsWater.com

Tell us about your business: At Jnana [yana] Organics, we supply organic, fresh-pressed green juice cleanses and juice/food combo cleanses by the day, week or month to help kick-start healthier eating if you’ve overindulged on vacation or if you simply want to release unwanted weight.

What services or products do you offer? We offer gluten-free, vegan, raw breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks. We are available for vegan catering, bridal parties and in-store events, and this summer we will be selling and sampling products at John Jay Farmers Market and Whole Foods Farmers Markets.

Any classes, events, specials or limited-time offers? Save 5 percent when you sign up for a five-day Juice & Food combo cleanse. All cleanses must be pre-ordered at 917.592.8360 or jnanaorganics@gmail.com, with 24 hours’ notice and pick-up at our kitchen (by appointment only) or delivery in Westchester and CT for an additional $20.

What is your goal or professional passion? Our goal is to help individuals and families clean up their diets to prevent or reverse illness through the use of wholesome and natural ingredients, and to provide the tools necessary for them to achieve their health and wellness goals.

Jolo’s Kitchen Vegan Restaurant

Marc “Jolo” Moise, Owner/Chef

412 North Ave., New Rochelle, NY 10801

914.355.2527 • JolosKitchen.com

Tell us about your business: Jolo’s Kitchen opened in 2008 as a vegan restaurant with the mission of providing healthy, nutritious meals to the Westchester County community.

What services or products do you offer? We have a totally vegan sit-down menu and take-out. We also have desserts, a juice bar and raw and gluten-free options, as well as a catering hall for small events.

Any classes, events, specials or limited-time offers? Recently we successfully hosted a MeetUp group, The Westchester NY Veggie EatUp, in our new space. Jolo’s Kitchen will also be vending in the New Rochelle Jazz Festival July 13-14 from 1 to 9 p.m. The festival will be held at the New Rochelle Public Library Green. Check out our website or Facebook page for ongoing vegan events.

What is your goal or professional passion? I am a longtime vegan, and for years I had the vision of creating a casual, music- and art-filled, affordable space where I could share my love for vegan cuisine and natural living. Mother Nature provides all we need to thrive; I do my best to honor the plants that provide us with nourishment and to create a delicious experience.

Lauren Lee, Gluten-Free Chef

250 Bronxville Rd., Bronxville, NY 10708

917.378.5787 • Lauren@gluten-freegourmet.com • Gluten-FreeGourmet.com

Tell us about your business: I am a personal chef who prepares gluten-free meals in clients’ homes. I also deliver prepared meals to Westchester and Manhattan. I studied as a pastry chef and love making gluten-free desserts.

What service or products do you offer? I make gluten-free meals and desserts.

Any classes, events, specials or limited-time offers? I offer a half-pound of gluten free chocolate chip cookies for first-time clients

What is your goal or professional passion? My passion is creating flavorful meals for people with dietary restrictions.

Ryder Farm Cottage Industries

Betsey Ryder, Owner of Ryder Farm

400 Starr Ridge Rd., Brewster, NY 10509

845.279.4161 • RyderFarmOrganic@aol.com • RyderFarmOrganic.com

Tell us about your business: We are certified organic growers of vegetables, herbs and flowers, from arugula to zucchini. We specialize in custom garden flower arrangements.

What services or products do you offer? Our certified organically grown products are available locally through our CSA, where you join the farmer up-front to help launch the season in exchange for a share of the season’s bounty. We participate in the Brewster Farmers Market from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays. We also offer produce at our roadside stand on the farm, as well as potted bedding plants and vegetable starts for your own garden.

Any classes, events, specials or limited-time offers? We enjoy sharing the lessons of growing good food. Among our local interns are stewards of Multinational Exchange for Sustainable Agriculture  (MESA) and international exchange, and we annually host a student from NYC’s agricultural high school, John Bowne of Queens. The public is welcome to join us or just come stroll the gardens. On August 4 we will host the 50th birthday celebration for the Southeast Museum. That event will be open to the public.

What is your goal or professional passion? Buying from local farms helps preserve the fabric of a working landscape and open space. Supporting Ryder Farm ensures that you are getting fresh local produce as well as supporting open space and a local history that goes back to 1795.

Skinny Buddha Organic Kitchen

Elyce Jacobson, Head Chef/Part Owner

159 Lexington Ave., Mt. Kisco, NY 10549

914.666.9646

info@myskinnybuddha.com • MySkinnyBuddha.com

Tell us about your business: We are a fitness facility as well as a commercial kitchen. We provide prepared organic meals for our fitness clients as well as anyone who craves high-quality, delicious, organic meals. We believe that in order to achieve optimal health, fitness and nutrition must work together.

What services or products do you offer? The Skinny Buddha Organic Kitchen offers full-service catering and, on a smaller scale, freshly prepared pre-packaged meals for pickup or delivery. Our menu is created with fresh, certified-organic ingredients, including vegetables, grains and fruits grown without pesticides as well as grass-fed, free-range chicken.

Any classes, events, specials or limited-time offers? In the fall we will be offering adult and teen cooking classes in our commercial kitchen.

What is your goal or professional passion? Our goal is to help people achieve optimal health by providing them with personalized training and the meals they need to accomplish their goals.